Book Review: Rings of Power by Mike Gillette

Shoulder health is a primary issue for me as a coach and an athlete.

As a former swimmer, I asked a lot from my shoulders then, and I continue to do so as an adult with daily use of kettlebells, barbells and bodyweight exercises. I don't intend to give those up, but much like Rings of Power author Mike Gillette, I discovered the surprising benefits of using the rings in the gym for shoulder health shortly after attending the Progressive Calisthenics Certification (PCC) last year.

Prior to reading Mike's book, my approach to using rings was occasional and haphazard -- practicing skin-the-cats, upside-down holds and L-sits maybe once-a-week. I really wasn't aware of all the other movements I could safely practice and progress with using the rings.

As Mike details, the rings are ideal for strength training and shoulder stability; the neutral arm position with the rings reduces joint involvement while allowing the wrists and elbows to move freely.

Mike, who has a background in military service, law enforcement, the martial arts and executive protection, had suffered injuries and had stopped strength training altogether until he discovered that the mechanics of the rings allowed him to again develop superior functional movement and strength without joint wear-and-tear.. 

He summarizes the on-the-ground and off-the-ground movements with five principles: 1) gravity 2) ergonomics 3) planes of movement 4) leverage and loading and 5) tension as technique.

I prefer the off-the-ground exercises, but I am incorporating more on-the-ground moves thanks to his book with photos, points-of-performance and regressions and progressions.

It is pretty exciting to realize that I have a piece of equipment in my gym that is pure gold and practicing with it is serious stuff ... but it feels like play as I explore new ranges of motion at my own pace.

I have been using moves such as ring roll-outs, inverted ring pushups, trunk extensions, rows, dips and vertical pulling -- all described in his book in detail.

Interested? Grab the book for yourself, along with a pair of rings, and head to the gym or find a goal post or monkey bars to attach them to. Practice, train and play and feel good afterward.

Strong Member Spotlight: Scott Wemer

Scott's strength journey has been a lot of fun because it seems like every time he walks into the gym he improves his technique or lifts more weight. He has great mental focus and enjoys new challenges while being consistent and moderate in his training.

He excels at the standard barbell deadlift and he is climbing toward 400#.

His kettlebell pressing is very strong along with the swing and the snatch.

He had not done much bodyweight training previously, so his squat, pull-up and pushup have also advanced tremendously.

I think Scott was surprised by how much he would enjoy learning to use kettlebells and barbells; it is hard to believe this is a new skill-set for him as he moves so naturally making it look easy.

It has been fun to watch how his kettlebell training helps him excel in cycling and running with much less training time. 

Here is Scott's strength journey in his own words ...

What led you to start with kettlebells?

I had noticed a lot of my running friends had started strength training and their times had been improving. I decided that strength training was something I needed to add to my training and I saw an article about kettlebells. It struck me as a perfect way to strengthen my entire body and not just certain muscles. Then a few months later I saw this little sign that said “Move Strong Kettlebells” and I gave it a try.

What has surprised you the most about your strength journey over the last year?

I surprise myself all the time in class. I can do so many more pushups then when I started. I had never done a deadlift before, and now I can pick up 170% of my body weight. 

I just like the overall strength I have developed. I improve my PRs just about every time we go for them. I used to shy away from the challenging movements, because I didn’t want to embarrass myself. Now I like to give them a shot and surprise myself almost every time. I call that everyday strength! 

What are your favorite movements and lifts?

Before I started at MoveStrong, I had tried the Snatch and Turkish get up at home. I never quite got it, and I thought I was going to hurt myself. After learning the technique from Lori, I would say those are my favorite kettlebell movements. I like the mix of technique and strength you need. 

I think my favorite lift would definitely be the deadlift! I had never done that before I started at MoveStrong. I always look forward to “DEADLIFT DAY!”  

How has strength training helped you in other sports and in daily life?

I ran a quarter marathon a couple of months ago. I hadn’t run much leading up to it, but I was able to run the whole six and a half miles without running to prepare. It was not as fast as I had in the past, but I was able to run it all.

Then the next weekend I did a 100 mile bike ride, I hadn’t ridden 100 miles total in the 8 months leading up to it, but I completed it just fine, and my friends were quite surprised about how well I was able to keep up. Fast forward to now, my cycle training has caught up to my conditioning and I can ride up front with my friends who have many more miles riding. 

In daily life, well, I have received compliments about my appearance in the last few months.

What would you tell someone who is hesitant to start strength training?

I would tell them that whether you are 26 or 66 you will benefit from some strength training. You don’t need to be training for a marathon, or century ride to strength train. It doesn’t mean becoming a body builder. It helps your posture, gives you the cardiovascular endurance  and generally makes you look and feel better. I have a friend at work who started strength training earlier this year. She is diabetic and was taking 80 units of insulin a day. After training for a while she is down to 14 units. Incredible! I believe that when I am 70 I can still be out there enjoying life and not just watching it. 

Outdoors

I believe it is essential to get outdoors and be physically active while the weather is good in Ohio -- whether in a park or urban area. I kick my gym members out of the gym sometimes -- and some of them are cheering and others ... not so much.

Yes it's air-conditioned, structured and tidy in the gym, but getting outdoors is necessary to challenge the brain and body in a different way. We have to deal with the sun and heat, different surroundings,, the ground surface (some of us are barefoot.)

Get outside. Watch the sunrise. Watch the sunset. How does that make you feel? Does it make you feel big or tiny? Because there’s something good about feeling both.
— Amy Grant

Today is Saturday and we did our Mobilizing Tight Muscles class outdoors surrounded by trees, with the sun peeking over the treetops, with a light breeze, birds chirping and a mix of urban sounds.

We use kettlebells a lot during our weekday training, so when we can mix it up with different methods and tools on Saturday, it's refreshing and invigorating.

I don't care what you say about fitness; if people aren't having fun, they won't keep it going.

So after our stretching class, we trained with battling ropes, wall ball, sledge-to-tire, sled pulls, sandbags moves, jumping rope, handstands, balance on curbs, pistol squat practice and some kettlebell juggling give the nervous system something new to process and a lot of growth and fun comes out of that process.

I love watching our members practice, learn and explore functional fitness in different ways. The opportunity for growth is boundless. Interested in joining us? We'd love to have you.

 

Listening to Your Body

Listening to your body is the most important skill you will develop in the gym.

Much like learning the kettlebell swing, or the barbell deadlift, it takes time and practice to become a really good listener.

Many of us have spent a lot of time ignoring signals from our bodies, so this may be something totally new for you.

I promise there will be times when you want to do something in your brain, but your body doesn't feel ready -- and you know it and ignore it any way.

I can't tell you how many times I have trained alone and raised the 24kg KB to start a getup -- only to put it back down. My body says no ... over and over and over. My head says yes over and over and over. But it doesn't feel right. I feel wobbly and unsure. Fortunately, I detest being injured, so I have learned to listen and react accordlingly. I will continue to listen because I have learned through experience that ignoring my body will result in an issue I will have to REALLY listen to later.

Listening usually requires a response. So do it. You know I support you. If you want to go lighter, sit out, go heavier, stretch, or go home. I will support whatever your body tells you to do.

Listening is the essential skill to keep you safe and safely progressing in the gym.

I can't feel what you feel. I wish I could. I joke about attaching a meter to you to get the same feedback you are getting. I wish it were possible.

I do see signs of what you are feeling, but I depend on you to confirm them. And most of the time, you are great about listening. You are learning to take charge of your body so that you know what to do and how to respond no matter where you are and what physical activity you are doing.

I believe that listening is the greatest PR you can ever achieve. 

And what you hear and feel will change constantly. Once moment you might feel strong and fresh and ready to bump up weight. In an instant, there could be a muscle twinge, or an empty feeling like you just ran out of energy. You could feel like you are on top-of-the-world, or tired from a lack of sleep the night before. You will experience so many scenarios that I can't even begin to summarize them here. There is never a moment off from listening, feeling, discerning and learning.

Here are some tips to improve your listening ability:

  • Nourish your body with food, sleep, water and rest so that you can really hear what your body is saying to you when you train in the gym.
  • Train with a coach who will guide you and help you discern what your body is telling you.
  • Never let a muscle twinge or joint issue, or anything that feels weird, go unnoticed. Stop, assess and address.
  • Pay attention to changes, such as a loss of balance, reduced grip strength, extreme tightness, light-headedness, an inability to concentrate, pain and so on. Listen and react.
  • If in doubt about how much is too much, take a day off and rest! Training should not deplete you; it should energize you.
  • Keep a journal to log how you feel or use our online skills tracking program to log results/concerns in the Notes section. Review often. Share with your coach if you wish.
  • Add some gentle movement and stretching outside the gym "to feel it out" if your body is sending you signals of concern. Address the signals now.
  • Talk with your coach if you have questions or concerns. Don't stay quiet because you don't want to call attention to yourself in class. I always want to know.
  • Listen during the training session, afterward, later in the day, the next morning, two days later and at the end of the week, month, year. How do you feel? Yep, listening, and therefore, learning, never stops. 

Being a good listener will help you keep your body safe in the gym and in your everyday life. 

Never lose sight of why you are training in the first place: to be healthy, strong and vibrant for life and sport. Nothing is worth compromising that overarching goal.

Strong Member Spotlight: Maddie Revis

When Maddie joined the gym late last year, she was very motivated to get strong and she had just started on her weight loss journey. She learned to use kettlebells quickly and made a commitment to training with consistency and moderation. She loves being physically active and I admire how she has incorporated exercise into her social life with events like the Warrior Dash, Urban Obstacle, charity fitness events, softball and light runs in the park with friends.

Most of our members know Maddie because her work hours vary, so she is able to attend at different class times. She can occasionally attend two classes a day, but she is really good about listening to her body and resting or changing up her fitness activity when needed.

Maddie is a great team player who encourages and applauds others in class. She is already developing a coaches' eye. She is humble and a lot fun to coach. She is serious about her kettlebell training, but she has fun too -- the perfect combination to make fitness sustainable over a lifetime.

With her solid kettlebell technique, and consistent training, she has become very strong. Her body has been transforming since she started because of her commitment to staying active and maintaining life balance with work, rest, training and play.

I think, like many people, Maddie was surprised at the cardiovascular benefits of kettlebells ... and how you get hooked on how good it feels when you move well and move strong.

The Turkish Getup did not come easy for Maddie, but she is now using a 48# KB and moving with ease. That is what I am most proud of at this moment. That and how well she moves with kettlebell snatches ... because not everyone does -- they are challenging -- but she makes it look easy!

Maddie will continue to get stronger and leaner ... I see no limits to what she can do in the gym and I look forward to helping her reach her goal of the RKC-I in 2016. ~Lori

Maddie's fitness journey in her own words:

What do you like most about strength training with kettlebells?

Training with kettlebells keeps me interested. I feel challenged every time I pick up a kettlebell. I started training with kettlebells just a little over six months ago, and I am still intrigued with the shape, size and variety of weight there is to use. Training with kettlebells is not a job or a task, I look forward to it. Waking up at 5:45 a.m. to work out is no longer a chore. I get this excitement the night before because I know I will be indulging in a new challenge as soon I step foot in the gym. It doesn’t compare to any other workout – I get both strength and cardio conditioning. It is never choreographed or routine. What I like most is the immediate response from my body when I train with kettlebells—the after-workout soreness in various muscle groups and the endorphins kicking in.

What are your favorite movements and lifts?

The Snatch is my favorite kettlebell movement. I am fascinated with how beautiful it is and how much control it requires. The Snatch came to me relatively easily, and that may be why I like it so much. Just recently I found my passion for the Turkish Get Up. The TGU required a lot of practice for me.  From the get-go, my form lacked and I didn’t really understand the purpose of getups. I thought it was hard enough work to get up off the floor with just my body weight. After a lot, a lot, of practice, I finally nailed the form, and I am now challenging myself with heavier weight. Like the Snatch, the TGU is also a very beautiful, intriguing movement. As much as I despise squatting, it is also on my list of favorite movements, primarily because it uses legs, which in my opinion is the strongest part of my body. I love that it takes discipline to squat, and that with kettlebells, we mix it up with racked double bells or goblet squats. We also use barbells and I am proud to say that I can Zercher squat 123 lbs.

What are some results you have seen since you started strength training?

The major results I have seen with strength training include weight loss and development of muscle mass. It took 6 months for me to lose 52 lbs. in a healthy manner, with some adjustments to my diet, mainly eating smaller portions and more protein. While training with kettlebells, I have gained muscle mass in every area of my body, which has triggered a quicker metabolism. I am fascinated with how my body has changed, in fact every time I look in the mirror I am proud of it. You can ask anyone that I know—I am the happiest and most confident I have ever been. I feel great and I am pain free. On days that I go without strength training, I can feel my body craving it. Every movement I have learned with kettlebells is applicable to my daily life. I work in retail, where it is required to lift heavy objects and stand on my feet all day. I can say that both come easier to me since training with kettlebells.

Was there anything that surprised you in this process?

I think what surprised me most about training with kettlebells is how quickly I have seen results. When I started, I was focused on losing weight. I was committed to exercising every day of the week, sometimes twice a day, incorporating spinning and softball, and any other periodic outdoor activities. I have hit a plateau with my weight loss, but I can feel my body changing every day—both mentally and physically. I have slowed down a lot with the amount of extra cardio I am doing. I recently ran the Urban Obstacle 5k, and I didn’t even train for it. I was able to complete it with no problem, and I know it was due to the strength and cardio conditioning from training with kettlebells. I totally underestimated the passion that I have developed for kettlebells, and the confidence I have gained in my everyday life. It is liberating to know that not all progress made is physical.

What are your goals over the next year?

Over the next year, I will still be focusing on gaining muscle mass and losing fat. I will spend my time training to participate in the RKC certification in April, 2016. My short term goal is to barbell deadlift more than my body weight and to eventually master the strict pushup and pullup. 

A Little Play to Get Stronger

Ever since I started teaching strength and movement, I have included play components in personal training and in our small group class programming ... and of course in my own training. I refer to this as Fitness Freedom.

We all need time to explore, learn, be free from reps, sets, time and be allowed to challenge our bodies in new and different ways.

Any movement or lift can be considered a play component -- Fitness Freedom has less structure and allows the individual to make decisions about whether to push forward or pull back.

It needs to be safe, fun, and even a little bit challenging. It may be different than our typical gym programming or it may build on what we do every day.

Read my full blog post about Play on Dragon Door.

So much is gained from play: besides strength and conditioning ... there is confidence and excitement, in addition to the opportunity to develop (or improve) skills.

Give it a try and let me know how it goes!

 

Strong Member Spotlight: Ann Morrell

Ann Morrell is an outstanding kettlebell athlete for many reasons, but here are two: Consistency and Moderation. As a kettlebell coach, this is all I ask of every athlete.

From the beginning, Ann has been consistent in coming to class four days a week and she listens to her body to continue to progress and avoid injury -- pushing herself when needed and pulling back when her body tires -- or taking an extra rest day.

She came to MoveStrong Kettlebells with a background in kettlebells, so we worked on refining her technique and improving her mobility.

Ann is a busy professional who sees this way of training as integral to her life and she understands that moving well is a requisite for strength -- especially when her work days include sitting at a desk.

She is joy to coach and she inspires me, our coaches and our gym members with her kettlebell skills and conditioning.

Ann has been very patiently progressing to the point where she can work hard, with very little recovery time, and be energized for the rest of her day. ~Lori

Here is Ann's story in her own words ...

What do you like most about training at MoveStrong Kettlebells?

The availability of classes to fit my schedule is so great. And Lori has so much equipment. I like the kettlebell focus with the ability to mix in bodyweight work. The variety of training never gets boring.

Lori has deep focus on technique which facilitates regressions/progressions to things I didn't think I could do. She doesn't put limits on what her students can do. It sneaks up on you and you find yourself doing something you thought was out of your reach.

What improvements have you seen since training at MSK?

I feel stronger and I  am stronger because my kettlebell weights  have increased -- and I don't think I've maxed out yet. I can do vertical jumps which I was always afraid of doing and I can even hand-foot crawl which I've always dreaded.

How does what you do in the gym apply to daily life?

I've always worked out and I am not a very happy person when there are disruptions to my workout schedule. The MSK class schedule allows me to come often and stay happy. 

Is there a moment that stands out for you with a personal best or skill development?

I am thrilled that I can do vertical jumps!

Why should someone consider training with kettlebells at MSK?

It's really a body-transforming sport. You just need to add consistency to see results. ~Ann

The RKC-I Experience from the Heart

I cry fairly easy. In fact, I cry at every certification event, no matter what role I play because of the intensity of the experience.

The candidates put a great amount of time and effort into preparing ... and when they arrive an emotional and unpredictable journey begins.

We recently had the privilege of hosting our first RKC-I event at our gym, MoveStrong Kettlebells, and I was reminded of the tumultuous emotions that weave in and out of the 3-day event. This is a group of people who are striving together toward a very specific goal that is tough to achieve: to be RKC.

Men and women of different ages, fitness levels and backgrounds come together to refine their hardstyle kettlebell technique in their own bodies,. They test their metal with 100 snatches in 5 minutes. They teach kettlebell skills to each other and also to people from the community we invite in to give them a real-life experience.

Read Neal's perspective (one of the RKC candidates) in his Dragon Door blog post here.

They learn a lot about their bodies and how to mobilize them with different stretching and movement techniques throughout the weekend to complement the presentations, workouts, kettlebell skill practice and of course, coaching each other.

RKC candidates can spend many months, even years, with an eye toward the RKC.

Their understanding of RKC principles is facilitated by watching and cueing each other with instructor presentations and continuous hands-on practice. They become more comfortable and confident with each other and with themselves as the weekend unfolds.

Never underestimate the power of dreams and the influence of the human spirit. we are all the same in this notion: The potential for greatness lives within each of us.
— Wilma Rudolph

The kettlebell facilitates this experience of learning how the body moves and then how to move the body better. Developing ballistic power and patience for grinds is not necessarily intuitive. It is developed with mindful practice and an understanding of power production from the hips, managing relaxation and tension combined with the proper preparation in terms of strength and conditioning. 

The RKC-I is filled with striving and growing, excitement and exhaustion, and to some degree, a stepping out into the unknown of what the body and mind can do when safely challenged like it has not been challenged before.

The RKC experience reveals something new to each candidate; it may awaken, change, disturb, surprise, invigorate or distress. Or maybe all of these, and more, over the course of the weekend. It is an experience they will never forget. It may even change the direction of their careers, and therefore, their lives.

The body and mind might tire, but the marvelous display of the human spirit marches on. The candidates relish each other's improvements and accomplishments as if they were their own -- because the group eventually begins working together as one. 

Challenge is the pathway to engagement and progress in our lives. But not all challenges are created equal. Some challenges make us feel alive, engaged, connected, and fulfilled. Others simply overwhelm us. Knowing the difference as you set bigger and bolder challenges for yourself is critical to your sanity, success, and satisfaction.
— Brendon Buchard

Some will have a few skills yet to refine after the RKC weekend concludes, but it does not diminish the experience. Instead, it presents yet another growth opportunity for these teachers-of-strength.

As with any skill, the learning process continues on, and joyfully so.

Great friendships are forged, fond memories are made and then it's home to infuse their lives with the power and energy of the RKC.

Our RKC sisters and brothers span the globe. With these skills we can touch people in gyms, schools, teams, community centers, churches, military, law enforcement, social groups, families and more.

While we are physically moving iron, we know that it is truly not about the iron, but rather how we can impact people with strength that leads to healthy, happy lives. We can't ask for much more. ~Lori Crock, RKC Team Leader 

Time to Re-think My Goals

A guest post by Al Crock.

I have been lifting weights, primarily barbell exercises, since I was 14 years old.  The initial motivation was to gain weight on a very skinny body in an effort a play some sport – any sport.

You may find this hard to believe, but after almost 40 years,  I have not appeared in a Muscle Magazine or stood on stage to show off my physique?!  What makes you/me think that will ever happen?  Why would I want to  buy an entire new wardrobe?  Time to re-think my goals.

Yet, I still lift weights beyond what a normal, smart person would attempt, whether it is the Bench Press, Trap Bar, or heavy Rows. 

Gotta do more than yesterday. Gotta do more than that guy over there. The more I lift, the bigger I will get and closer to that ‘middle linebacker’ body every male desires. 

Just read any health magazines. It's gotta be true. After four surgeries and 31 years of marriage, I think it is time to think not how much weight I can lift, but how long I can lift any challenging weights?  This thought process has only taken the last 10 years so it is obviously well-thought out.  Time to re-think my goals.

After being exposed to kettlebells (KBs) for the first time a few years ago, it still amazes me that I can achieve more strength, more flexibility and more muscle definition without being in some form of constant pain.  No wraps or gloves.  No wide belts or shoes. Just a little bit of talc powder. 

I think the reason it took so long to actually admit this revelation is because it was my wife’s constant drumming of KB benefits and instruction. “She can’t know what she’s talking about.  I have been lifting weights for 40 years?!"  The fact that she is now RKC I & II certified means very little to me. I knew her when she didn’t know the difference between a dumbbell and a kettlebell. Time to re-think my goals.

Yet, when I do sneak away and to do barbell lifts, or  front/back squat or any of the other “heavy lifts”,  I am amazed at the increase in strength, not to mention my overall better form .... and I haven’t done anything stupid in months! How is that possible? 

I never saw Arnold swing a KB 500 times. I never heard of the NFL Combines including a  KB Snatch Ladder. I was sure it was a matter of time before I fell back into my old ways. And believe me I tried. Time to re-think my goals.

Then I turned 50 years old.

I started paying attention to what my wife/trainer was actually saying. I started eating less crap and more quality food and fewer second helpings. She finally convinced me that you have to ‘listen’ to your body', not abuse your body.

I can still push myself to failure and sweat with the best of them, but I don’t have to hurt. And I watch her clients lose weight, achieve goals that people their age shouldn't be able to achieve -- and I no longer eat Ibuprofen like sweet tarts.

can swing a KB 500 times. I can perform 100 Snatches in less than 5 minutes and I can jump rope 200 reps without smacking my toes. That was just last week.  How many 53-year-old guys walking around can say that right now?

Al swings the 150# KB for several sets of 10!

Al swings the 150# KB for several sets of 10!

More practical ... I can jump up into the back of a pickup truck. I can hang multiple deer tree stands 20 feet off the ground in one day. I can give a 9-year-old kid a shoulder ride for a mile up a dirt road. How many 53-year-old guys walking around can say that right now?

I will never compete in the Crossfit games. I will never be invited to a NFL Combine. Nor, will anyone ask me to take my shirt off in public. I don’t care. There, I said it. Happy?

Because when I am able to move with power in everyday life, pain-free, and still fit into jeans that I wore five years ago, I think that I have achieved something that most of my buddies would like to say they could, but they can’t. Not today.  Time for them to re-think their goals.

I can thank kettlebells and a relentless wife.

Deadlift Day and Moments of Greatness

Friday was barbell deadlift day.

deadlift day!.png

It reminded me how many Moments of Greatness occur at our gym every day, in every class, as nearly everyone gets better in some way each time they walk in the door. 

Moments of Greatness are specific to each person. No two moments are alike. My definition of a Moment of Greatness might be different than yours. 

We had a lot of deadlift personal bests today. Those are Moments of Greatness, but also key to providing us important feedback about our overall fitness journey.

Mr.-Rogers-deadlift.jpg

First, it shows us that our strength and conditioning program is working. We don't deadlift that often -- probably two or four times a month. We don't have to do it several times a week to see improvements -- our functional training approach works the entire body, so we are in essence, 'deadlift ready' at all times.

We are staying injury-free and getting stronger ... without killing ourselves with hours and hours in the gym. The average gym member makes great strides with three 45-minute classes a week.

But more exciting to me is that the deadlift technique was beautifully executed. Get the movement right, and you can keep improving ... literally forever if you pair smart training with proper recovery and nutrition.

And even more exciting to me is that our members are learning to listen to their bodies and challenge themselves appropriately when the time is right. When they are not feeling it, they train where they are comfortable that day.

Another Moment of Greatness is when I hear members cheering on other members to personal bests. Getting excited about the achievements of others is inspiring.

My hubby joined in 6:30 a.m. class today (we usually train together between classes at 7:30 a.m.) and he was having so much fun watching Theda and Scott reach new PRs with their deadlifts, that he didn't even add up what was on his barbell.  Al is competitive and I have never seen him NOT add up his weight. So that was a special Moment of Greatness.

Our 10,000 swing challenge is building resilience, power and strength that applies to everything else we do, including deadlfits.

Another Moment of Greatness is watching people stop to foam roll, or stretch or adjust if something feels funny at that very moment ... to prevent injury and missed time in the gym. 

Happily, I don't remember the last time I referred someone to the chiropractor.

It is paramount to appreciate the Moments of Greatness that occur in the gym every day because we are training to be awesome in our everyday lives.

And if we are strong, healthy, happy and energetic, we can do a lot of good for others. That makes me the happiest of all because that puts us on our way to a Lifetime of Greatness..

Our gym members already excel in life and this helps them to reach new heights as confident, clear-thinking, active, vibrant people who are not afraid to tackle new challenges, both physical and mental.

If you aren't training with us, we'd love to have you!

And if you can't, train with us, find a gym with a positive environment where you can learn to move well first, get strong, and then celebrate Moments of Greatness with each other daily. It feels good.