Outdoors

I believe it is essential to get outdoors and be physically active while the weather is good in Ohio -- whether in a park or urban area. I kick my gym members out of the gym sometimes -- and some of them are cheering and others ... not so much.

Yes it's air-conditioned, structured and tidy in the gym, but getting outdoors is necessary to challenge the brain and body in a different way. We have to deal with the sun and heat, different surroundings,, the ground surface (some of us are barefoot.)

Get outside. Watch the sunrise. Watch the sunset. How does that make you feel? Does it make you feel big or tiny? Because there’s something good about feeling both.
— Amy Grant

Today is Saturday and we did our Mobilizing Tight Muscles class outdoors surrounded by trees, with the sun peeking over the treetops, with a light breeze, birds chirping and a mix of urban sounds.

We use kettlebells a lot during our weekday training, so when we can mix it up with different methods and tools on Saturday, it's refreshing and invigorating.

I don't care what you say about fitness; if people aren't having fun, they won't keep it going.

So after our stretching class, we trained with battling ropes, wall ball, sledge-to-tire, sled pulls, sandbags moves, jumping rope, handstands, balance on curbs, pistol squat practice and some kettlebell juggling give the nervous system something new to process and a lot of growth and fun comes out of that process.

I love watching our members practice, learn and explore functional fitness in different ways. The opportunity for growth is boundless. Interested in joining us? We'd love to have you.

 

Competitive or Collaborative?

I was interviewed by a news reporter recently for an article in The Columbus Dispatch about competitiveness in the gym. Read the story here.

I felt like I had a split personality as I was talking to the reporter ... because while I consider myself a collaborative person, when I am really honest with myself, I see that my true nature is, well, competitive.

So what does this mean in terms of daily fitness training?

I think it means that we should accept our true nature, but I also think that most people can benefit from a mix of competition and collaboration in fitness.

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MovNat is collaborative, but in a MovNat team-building event recently, after working collaboratively, we created some friendly competition by splitting into teams for a little tug-o-war. The group was hungry for it.

Here are some questions to ponder if you consider yourself a competitive person and struggle with that a bit (like me).

1. What is your true nature?

Don't fight your true nature; work with it. But definitely fine-tune it appropriately for the people you are with and for the situation. In terms of competing with my husband, I do that at times where it makes sense -- when it's just the two of us training and with appropriate fitness tools. We don't compete in areas that would be unsafe or there is a ridiculously large difference in our skill levels.

2. How do you use competitiveness for good?

Keep it in perspective. Be safe and progress appropriately. Listen to your body. Have fun and keep a light spirit -- a good challenge can keep you progressing, but don't let it get out of control or someone could get hurt -- when form falls apart, the competition is over.

3. When is collaborative and/or competitive appropriate?

I think collaborative and competitive work together on and off all the time. Helping each other, correcting form, reminding the other to hydrate, stretch, spot a lift ... that's collaborative. Wanna see how many Kettlebell swings we can do in a minute? That's competitive, but in the case of hubby and me, we are competing with ourselves and each is using Kettlebell weights appropriate for our individual skill level.

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4. Can you achieve good results without competition?

For sure. We do it all the time. Working together toward a goal is fun. Shouldering a log together ... one day we ran up a hill side-by-side carrying heavy rocks -- fun and challenging -- we told ourselves "this is not competitive," and it felt great to laugh and move fast. Although, I have to admit  ... I was racing him ... as I always do  ... and I can promise you ... he was racing me too.

Do you tune in to your true nature and use it for good?

A Taste of Fitness Freedom

Saturday was pretty cool so I have to write and tell you about it. First, we had a MovNat and Paleo Meetup where this week we taught and practiced Efficient Running, Crawling and Throwing (rocks) outdoors.

Second, my daughter Sarah and her boyfriend Slade came in for their first session with me indoors.

Third, one of our bridal clients and her fiance came in from out of state to train with us.

What the three have in common is this ...

They all experienced Fitness Freedom.

The Meetup folks learned to run efficiently and naturally, the MovNat way ... and this is totally counter-cultural to our heavily-padded tennis shoe world of running.

We practiced excellent form barefoot, or in socks, to get the feel of the forefoot landing with an emphasis on posture, leg pull and the landing. Based on their feedback, it was a positive change in running form -- one that was quite eye-opening; it gave them something new to take with them and explore further in their daily lives.

Sarah and Slade experienced an indoor movement session with a mix of MovNat (climbing, crawling), TRX and Kettlebells. It especially resonated with Slade -- as an engineer whose job includes plenty of time working at a computer. I believe the physical fitness will be a nice addition to his life as he seeks to increase strength and have fun doing it.

Finally, Anthony and Valessa enjoyed exploring the Waterfall park with me through the practice of MovNat. The weather was perfect and the fallen logs allowed us to practice the deadlift, clean-and-jerks, crawling, balancing and climbing and jumping.

Their minds were open to all of it, and to experience it together, both indoors and in nature, was really special.

Here Valessa's testimonial about how she enjoyed training in nature and learning MovNat with us over the last month or so.

I can’t describe how much fun it is to teach these incredible people to explore their environment through simple, safe, efficient movement and to watch them learn, grow and unfold in new ways as their view of fitness changes.

On days like this, fitness coaching feels like the best job in the world because I get to help people have fun, appreciate their bodies, learn to move well in new ways, reconnect with nature -- and with each other.

Want to experience Fitness Freedom too? Contact us to get started.

Back to My Roots

When my aunt and uncle visited recently from Hawaii, they stopped by MovNat Ohio to see the place and find out more about what I was doing. My parents were there too ,and of course I made the entire group of 70+ year-olds walk down to the River Park with me to better understand MovNat and how we practice it. My dad immediately challenged me lift a 400 lb. log, yeah right, but at least he appeared to understand what I was talking about. My aunt is very perceptive. On the walk to the park she commented “you must be so happy to return to your jock roots.”

What jock roots?

I haven’t thought much about how from age 10-19, I was Swimmer. That was it -- my whole high school identity, all that I cared about, my entire social life, everything was about swimming.

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Lori the HIgh School Swimmer

It had also been my family’s main social life as my younger sister swam too, and we had lots of with out-of-town swim meets where we ended up becoming very close to other swimmer families.

I swam 3-4 hours a day, before and after school, trained on Nautilus machines (LOL) and had ‘visualization’ training with some psych major from The Ohio State Universtity.

My high school swim team, which I captained for two years, won State repeatedly and our relay made it to Junior Olympics. It was a great experience and I have lots of happy memories.

I then decided I wanted a ‘normal life’ and quit swimming when I hit college -- much to my dad’s dismay as he was planning on a swimming scholarship to pay for it.

At Miami University of Ohio, I immediately gained the freshman 15 and began running with my college roommates to get back on track.

I have been running on and off, along with trying other various fitness programs, ever since.

About a year ago I discovered MovNat and now I run using MovNat running techniques either bare foot or in minimal shoes. Running gets me to cool parks and playgrounds to practice MovNat.

So with my aunt’s insight, I now feel more like my transition from marketing pro to MovNat trainer is pretty natural. There have been a couple points in this transition where I feel a bit crazy -- scaling back a marketing business and ramping up a fitness business at age 50?

Sure, why not -- I can live in both worlds. A lot of people do.

Hopefully other former athletes will find their way to MovNat, get back to their jock roots, so to speak, and embrace something new, exciting and different in MovNat.

I think they, like me, will be pleasantly surprised at how naturally MovNat can fit into their lives.