Goals vs. Intentions

We recently did some goal-setting at the gym.

We focused on the areas of Mobility, Flexibility and Strength. We train to be better for everyday life, so many of our goals are related to improving moves and lifts, weights or times that are not easy for us.

A few of us also have specialized sports we enjoy so our strength goals have to support and work with those efforts as well.

There are always a few people who tell me their goal is to have a goal -- and that's okay too.

                                        Goals can be anything that challenges and excites you!

                                        Goals can be anything that challenges and excites you!

In every class, I see new goals emerge organically as we identify weak links in our bodies.

Turning weaknesses into strengths can help prevent injury and help us advance our training in ways we didn't know were possible.

Working to improve a snatch technique, or single-leg balance, working toward more ankle mobility, getting swings done with more weight, or with more ease, are goals that are attainable with dedicated practice.

Goal-setting is not a one-time activity. We may not realize it, but we do it every day, in little ways; you may consider them intentions rather than goals.

Goal-setting is a way for us to acknowledge potential areas of growth and to identify new challenges that excite us and give new focus to our physical and mental training.

It also helps guide me as your coach, to know what you feel needs improvement, to help you prepare and progress in ways that are meaningful to you.

There is some accountability involved when we state a goal out loud. Often goals are kept privately and that is fine too.

If we focus on daily intentions ... our little stepping stones of improvement, done on a regular basis, we can enjoy the strength journey, rather than be concerned about the end result.

If you’re bored with life - you don’t get up every morning with a burning desire to do things - you don’t have enough goals.
— Lou Holtz

There is never a point at which we are done growing and improving; intentions / goals can be infinite.

Hopefully, put us on a path of self-growth, self-improvement and self-discovery.

I remember when I was practicing a lot of skills to prepare my body for the pistol squat; skills such as single-leg deadlifts, narrow squats, single-leg squat- to-box, single-leg squat on a raised surface, and  a lot of mobility/flexibility with hips, knees and ankles. I was preparing for the RKC-II so this was a goal imposed on me that I would not have worked on otherwise.

I learned a lot about my body and how to help others with this skill so it became a valuable goal. I rarely did full pistols in my preparation -- I had my daily intentions to work on I patiently progressed (over several months) to my goal of doing a pistol at the RKC-II.

A more traditional definition of a goal is this: specific, measurable, actionable, realistic and timebound (SMART). See a great article about this here.

Goals can help motivate us, dig us out of a rut and make training more interesting, especially if we are competitive-natured. Is anyone out there competitive? Yes, I thought so.

Goals can bring great changes to our routine and help us learn something new about ourselves in the process. If we aren't able to get to the goal -- our bodies might not be capable, and that's okay, as the journey is what matters most. ~Lori